NCHS Pressroom - 2004 News Release - Teens Delaying Sexual Activity - postponing sexual involvement cdc

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postponing sexual involvement cdc - Sexual Health | CDC


Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website. The Postponing Sexual Involvement (PSI) program is a school-based program designed to delay sexual activity among adolescents. The curriculum was widely introduced into the Atlanta public schools in 1985 and was taught to eighth graders by health educators, nurses, and adolescent counselors using teens as primary presenters.

Find CDC resources to protect your sexual health. Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website.. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. Postponing Sexual Involvement (PSI) is a widely implemented middle school curriculum designed to delay the onset of sexual intercourse. In an evaluation of its effectiveness among seventh and eighth graders in California, 10,600 youths from schools and co mmunity-based organizations statewide were recruited and participated in randomly assigned intervention or control groups; the curriculum.

Dec 10, 2004 · Two new reports present these and other detailed findings from the survey. Teenagers in the United States: Sexual Activity, Contraceptive Use, and Childbearing, 2002, and Use of Contraception and Use of Family Planning Services in the United States, 1982-2002, are available on the CDC website the CDC/NCHS Website. Postponing Sexual Involvement: An Educational Series We designed a new program, adapted from the model used in the smoking field, to help adolescents 13-15 years of age postpone sexual involvement and thereby curtail negative health outcomes (STDs and premature pregnancy). The assumptions that guided the development of the program were: 1.Cited by: 21.